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  #11  
Old 27-07-15, 18:50
vespasian vespasian is offline
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Thanks for that. That would then be two bits of good news as I have seachem prime and It has been raining like its a monsoon here today, so I now have a decent amount of rain water too. I will use it to do a big water change tomorrow. Do you think I should do 80%? Or would daily smaller ones be better?
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  #12  
Old 28-07-15, 12:25
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Hi all,
Quote:
Originally Posted by vespasian View Post
I will use it to do a big water change tomorrow. Do you think I should do 80%? Or would daily smaller ones be better?
Doesn't have to be 80%, but I'd try a fairly large water change (50%?) with slightly cooler water. If it is an oxygen issue, the Bristlenose should return to the lower levels of the tank pretty much straight away.

cheers Darrel
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  #13  
Old 28-07-15, 18:45
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if your using rain water just be careful your kh doesnt bottom out and then trigger ph crash and subsequent slow rise in ammonia as beneficial bacteria will stop ammonia,nitrite conversion...

kh is basically a measure of carbonates in your water... every living thing consumes carbonates in your tank.... normally your tap water will have a good level of kh in it - approx 4 degrees of kh... so regular water changes tops up your kh and you never experience ph crash etc... its the carbonates that also buffer your ph and keep it steady...

but with rain water it can be deficient in kh so just be weary and perhaps test it
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  #14  
Old 28-07-15, 21:14
vespasian vespasian is offline
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Thanks again.
Unfortunately I don't have a Kh test, I will have to get one asap. I held off with doing the rain water change today after seeing johnno's post. I don't know if this would be any good to do but would it be possible to remineralize the rain water with a little tap water (like using RO water)?
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  #15  
Old 29-07-15, 13:18
dw1305 dw1305 is offline
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Hi all,
Quote:
Originally Posted by vespasian View Post
I don't know if this would be any good to do but would it be possible to remineralize the rain water with a little tap water (like using RO water)?
Yes you can do. I don't test the dKH, but I measure the conductivity, and mix rainwater and tap (about 17dKH) to give tank water at ~120microS (~80ppm TDS).

If you live in the S. or E. of the UK You will probably find that the rain-water is already dKH buffered from lime rich dust in the atmosphere.

cheers Darrel
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  #16  
Old 29-07-15, 18:48
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gee if your rainwater is absorbing that much kh in the form of limestone dust - what else does it contain ? sounds like tap water might be better option...
i live up in the perth hills in western australia and our rainwater has zero kh and is very drinkable...
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  #17  
Old 29-07-15, 20:58
vespasian vespasian is offline
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Thanks for the replies. I live in Northumberland and the geology is generally pretty hard (metamorphic granites), so I would imagine the rain water would be fairly soft. I have now done a water change with the rain water and added some tap water to buffer it a little. I will be keeping a close eye on the pH levels.
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  #18  
Old 31-07-15, 12:15
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Hi all,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjohnnofish View Post
gee if your rainwater is absorbing that much kh in the form of limestone dust what else does it contain ? sounds like tap water might be better option...
Depends a little bit where you live, the problem for us in the UK is that a huge number of us live on a tiny island, mainly in the South. This impacts on both rain water and tap water quality.


Quote:
Originally Posted by vespasian View Post
Thanks for the replies. I live in Northumberland and the geology is generally pretty hard (metamorphic granites), so I would imagine the rain water would be fairly soft. I have now done a water change with the rain water and added some tap water to buffer it a little. I will be keeping a close eye on the pH levels.
You may find that your tap water is very low in carbonates, a lot of water in the UK is now soft, but alkaline with a high pH. This is because the water companies are adding NaOH to raise the pH and stop lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) from old pipes going into solution.

This raises pH (pH is a measure of the H+:OH- ratio, and you've added OH- ions), but it doesn't add any buffering, because all the OH- ions are in solution. Have a look at this thread <"http://www.plecoplanet.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9323">

You should be able to get water parameters from your water supplier.

cheers Darrel

Last edited by dw1305; 31-07-15 at 12:22. Reason: added NaOH bit
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  #19  
Old 14-08-15, 12:22
vespasian vespasian is offline
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I have been away for work for a while but I did the rain water water changes and left instructions with my better half to do some while I was away. I am very happy to report that my pleco is back to his normal happy and lively self.
Thank you very much for your help and advice, from both me and Def the bn plec.
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